Monthly Archives: December 2011

The Dalmation:Trusted Firehouse Dog

The dalmation is a widely recognized dog whose breed has been traced back to Dalmatia in the Republic of Croatia. Its spotted appearance has been associated with Disney’s 101 Dalmations and Budweiser but perhaps is best known as the “firehouse … Continue reading

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On the wagon, on the water

It is said that if you are abstaining from drinking alcohol you are effectively “ on the wagon”. The term has been associated with the Salvation Army and their push for temperance, especially during the days of horse drawn wagons … Continue reading

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Origin of the LEGO

In 1916 a Danish woodworker purchased a woodworking shop in Bilund, Denmark. In the beginning the new owner of the shop, Ole Kirk Christiansen, put his efforts into making furniture. The Great Depression hit around 1929 and caused there to … Continue reading

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Tips: it’s not just a restaurant thing

It is often customary in many countries that after a service is rendered the recipient endows the one performing the service with a gratuity. Often called a “tip” this extra money is often incorrectly described as meaning “To Insure Prompt … Continue reading

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Mistletoe: What’s “up” with that?

The mistletoe, as it turns out, is largely a parasitic plant that can live on its own as a free standing plant but is more often seen tangled within the branches of trees and shrubs. For many cultures throughout history … Continue reading

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Caught between the Devil and the Deep Sea

When someone is caught between a rock and hard place one might say that they are “between the devil and the deep sea”. Like many phrases there is no hard and fast explanation for this phrase but there are some … Continue reading

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A loose cannon

Not surprisingly this phrase, which is used today to describe someone or something out of control and able to cause harm or damage, is attributed to a nautical origin. During the time of wooden ships and naval warfare vessels carried … Continue reading

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